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Letter to an Unknown Soldier: A Sampling of the Letters

buzzfeed

Some of you may be aware that Letter to an Unknown Soldier made it on Buzzfeed. I thought I might take a stab at my own sort of Buzzfeed-style feature. You can read it below the cut.

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In Standard

Friends and Family: Featured Letters

Friends and Family: Featured Letters

I worked with Letter to an Unknown Soldier to create a digital memorial for WWI by asking people to write letters to the unknown soldier in Paddington Station. We had an astounding result–over 21,000 letters. And several of those were by my classmates, friends and family!

Similar to the daily featured letters on the website, I’ve gathered these letters together so that you can read them side by side. One of the fabulous things about this project is how the letters talk to each other—how they enter a dialogue together.

I hope that by reading the very different entries below, you’ll be encourage to think about your own response to the letters, to the soldier, and to war.

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Reflecting on Letters

Reflecting on Letters

I have been working since the end of June with Letter to an Unknown Soldier, a project which created a digital memorial for WWI by asking people to write letters to the unknown soldier in Paddington Station. We had an astounding result–over 21,000 letters. They came from the UK, from New Zealand, from Egypt, from Iceland. They were written by prisoners, school children, mothers, and politicians (including a prime minister). At times they were sweet, at times funny, at times heartbreaking.

It’s been an amazing project.

This is my last week working for it. We closed our submissions on Tuesday, and the editorial team is working to the end of the week to make sure everyone’s letters…Continue Reading

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A Starving Postgrad Student takes on Claridge’s

A Starving Postgrad Student takes on Claridge’s

(Originally written on June 12th.)

If you don’t know what Claridge’s is, that’s cool—I didn’t either a few weeks ago. But turns out it’s a super fancy hotel in London. When one of my mom’s friends had a conference coming, she invited me to stay with her. I said yes, but I didn’t know what I was getting into!

A man in a top hat and uniform stepped up to the cab to let us out. A bellhop took our luggage. We pushed through the spinny door (love me some spinny doors) and entered a huge, gorgeous room filled with light and marble and the gentle clinking of expensive wine glasses. Even the air seemed to carry invisible…Continue Reading

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Things Happening in “Real” Life

Things Happening in “Real” Life

I simultaneously feel like a lot has been happening and nothing has been happening. But for those of you who might be curious, here’s a roundup of the past two weeks or so.

School!

Graduate school is progressing marvelously. I received my marks for last term, and they were very encouraging. I’ve just been assigned my tutor—the person who I’ll be working with one-on-one over the summer to get my 50000 word “thesis” finished—and I’m really excited to start doing that. I’m in love with my program, and I can’t believe it’s flying by so fast.

Regency ball preparations!

A few friends and I have decided that we’re going to take the plunge and go to the Jane Austen Ball…Continue Reading

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The Madwoman’s Outlining Technique

The Madwoman’s Outlining Technique

Since my WIP, Illuminate, is also the thesis project for my graduate program, I don’t have as much time as I’m used to for fiddling around and rewriting stuff.

The logical response? Go absolutely crazy.

Step 1: Make Character Arcs for Everyone.

The Interwebs contain lots of great information about character arcs, so in brief: In the course of a story, characters will respond to conflict on an external and internal level, and by the conclusion characters will undergo some sort of change. This creates story arcs.

Every book has at least one major arc. I personally like Doug Tennapel’s advice to split stories into three acts, each with their own arc.

Here’s how I did it.

Write one sentence summaries…Continue Reading

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Tips for Surviving College: Do the Occasional Crazy Thing

crazy

This may seem counter to all my [insanely structure-based] tips earlier, but sometimes you just need to…

Blow your schedule out the window.

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